Shannon guest blogs about Caroline Bonaparte Murat

aroline Bonaparte Murat before the Bay of Naples by François Gérard

Caroline Bonaparte Murat before the Bay of Naples by François Gérard

It’s an honour to be featured on A Covent Garden Gilflurts Guide to Life, talking about Napoleons treasonous sister, Caroline Bonaparte Murat.

One tries to find redeeming features in Caroline, but they are hard to spot. Biographers have been quite unkind:

Caroline, with a baseness that makes her resemble some monstrous queen of antiquity, betrayed husband, brother, and country alike to slake the thirst of her unprincipled ambitions. (1)

French Foreign Minister Talleyrand was more generous:

Madame Murat had the head of Cromwell upon the body of a well-shaped woman. Born with much grandeur of character, strong mind, and sublime ideas; possessing a subtle and delicate wit, together with amiability and grace, seductive beyond expression; she was deficient in nothing but in the art of concealing her desire to rule; and when she failed in attaining her end, it was because she sought to reach it too quickly. (2)

To read the full post, click here. If you haven’t already visited Madame Gilflurt’s salon (“Glorious Georgian dispatches from the long 18th century”), I highly recommend it. A visit to Gin Lane is always enjoyable and enlightening.

  1. “Prefatory Note” by W.R.H. Trowbridge in Joseph Turquan, The Sisters of Napoleon, translated and edited by W.R.H. Trowbridge (London, 1908), p. ix.
  2. Catherine Hyde Govion Broglio Solari, Private Anecdotes of Foreign Courts, Vol. 1 (London, 1827), p. 456.

Madame Murat had the head of Cromwell upon the body of a well-shaped woman.

Talleyrand