• From the blog

    Quarantine in the 19th Century: Some Vignettes

    March 20, 2020

    Quarantine in the 19th Century: Some Vignettes

    Quarantine, or the practice of enforcing isolation upon people to prevent the spread of disease, goes back to at least the seventh century BC. The word quarantine comes from 14th-century Venice, where ships were required to lay at anchor for 40 (quaranta) days before landing, in an attempt to curb the outbreak of bubonic plague known as the Black Death. Quarantine was the main method of combatting the spread of transmissible disease in the 19th century, when there was no effective medical response. Here are some accounts of what quarantine was like in practice.

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  • Napoleon in America

    Napoleon in America

    What if Napoleon Bonaparte had escaped from St. Helena and wound up in the United States? Kirkus Reviews calls the first book in Shannon’s Napoleon series “evocative and immersive.”

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